Digital Pigeon

History of the World: Part I (1981)
Dole Office Clerk: Occupation? 
Comicus: Stand-up philosopher. 
Dole Office Clerk: What? 
Comicus: Stand-up philosopher. I coalesce the vapors of human experience into a viable and meaningful comprehension. 
Dole Office Clerk: Oh, a *bullshit* artist! 
Comicus: *Grumble*… 
Dole Office Clerk: Did you bullshit last week? 
Comicus: No. 
Dole Office Clerk: Did you *try* to bullshit last week? 
Comicus: Yes! 

[Condemned for offending Emperor Ceaser with his stand-up routine] 
Comicus: Boy, when you die at the palace, you really DIE at the palace! View Larger

History of the World: Part I (1981)
Dole Office Clerk: Occupation?
Comicus: Stand-up philosopher.
Dole Office Clerk: What?
Comicus: Stand-up philosopher. I coalesce the vapors of human experience into a viable and meaningful comprehension.
Dole Office Clerk: Oh, a *bullshit* artist!
Comicus: *Grumble*…
Dole Office Clerk: Did you bullshit last week?
Comicus: No.
Dole Office Clerk: Did you *try* to bullshit last week?
Comicus: Yes!

[Condemned for offending Emperor Ceaser with his stand-up routine]
Comicus: Boy, when you die at the palace, you really DIE at the palace!


chemung-valley-curator:

Elmira’s Clairvoyant Physician and the Spiritualism Movement by Kelli Huggins, Education CoordinatorWhen I was researching alternative medicine providers for our upcoming medical exhibit, I came across Mrs. R.H. Wilcox, a clairvoyant physician.  Given my fondness for historical eccentric folks, this was a topic I couldn’t resist.  Mrs. Wilcox is a great lens through which to examine not only the presence and popularity of clairvoyants and mediums locally, but also within the larger context of the spiritualism movement.The significant number of clairvoyants in Chemung County in the late 19th and early 20th centuries makes a lot of sense because spiritualism originated in Western New York.  This area, known as the “burned-over district,” was the birthplace of several religions during the Second Great Awakening (1790-1840), including Mormonism, the Millerites, and the Oneida Community.  Spiritualism is traced back to the Fox sisters from Wayne County.  Beginning in 1848, the Fox sisters claimed to be able to communicate with spirits through mysterious “rappings.”  The sisters traveled around performing séances and became famous.  However, in 1888 they admitted they were frauds.  Still, spiritualism remained popular and many men and women claimed to have supernatural powers. (READ MORE) View Larger

chemung-valley-curator:

Elmira’s Clairvoyant Physician and the Spiritualism Movement by Kelli Huggins, Education Coordinator

When I was researching alternative medicine providers for our upcoming medical exhibit, I came across Mrs. R.H. Wilcox, a clairvoyant physician.  Given my fondness for historical eccentric folks, this was a topic I couldn’t resist.  Mrs. Wilcox is a great lens through which to examine not only the presence and popularity of clairvoyants and mediums locally, but also within the larger context of the spiritualism movement.

The significant number of clairvoyants in Chemung County in the late 19th and early 20th centuries makes a lot of sense because spiritualism originated in Western New York.  This area, known as the “burned-over district,” was the birthplace of several religions during the Second Great Awakening (1790-1840), including Mormonism, the Millerites, and the Oneida Community.  Spiritualism is traced back to the Fox sisters from Wayne County.  Beginning in 1848, the Fox sisters claimed to be able to communicate with spirits through mysterious “rappings.”  The sisters traveled around performing séances and became famous.  However, in 1888 they admitted they were frauds.  Still, spiritualism remained popular and many men and women claimed to have supernatural powers. (READ MORE)